Competency framework

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A framework of competence is the language around which the desired behaviors, actions or abilities are described for a company’s many roles.

The core is an HR strategy that answers the question: What does it take to succeed, and what do we look for with our employees and managers? Without a framework that is concrete, behavior-based and well-founded, we get stuck in vague and inadequate descriptions that often mean different things to different decision makers – and not least – valued differently.

Competence frameworks as a support for selection, recruitment and development are found in most businesses today. Often they are expressing in collective documents and descriptions of what attitude, what way to be or approach information. Many times the value of the framework is not realized, precisely because it is not sufficiently substantiated and concrete. Well-built and implemented competence frameworks are linked to the business and the challenges of the role. They are distinct and behavior-based in order to be the hub of recruitment, selection, development and performance development. Not least, they realize values ​​as equal treatment, ensure that everyone is measured against the same template and create a unified language around what is being sought in the business.

MARIA LAHNE, SENIOR ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT, ASSESSI

“Businesses that succeed in establishing competence frameworks that are truly rooted, concrete and underpinned by solid analysis are winning so much. They capture who has the potential to act in line with the criteria demanded in selection processes. They develop their leaders in pursuing their leadership in line with their skills. By making the framework the hub of their work, they also succeed in developing their performance management. “

MARIA LAHNE, SENIOR ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT, ASSESSI

Establishing a framework always starts with an analysis; Do different employee roles make different demands? Are there different criteria for success at different leadership levels? Are there differences in roles that require completely different behaviors to achieve the goals? Does the business have a genuine valuation basis that is expressed in behaviors? Based on an in-depth collaboration, lined up with role analysis, review of materials, strategy and future challenges, workshops… yes, even observation in the role establishes a unique and concrete framework. Strategic HR initiatives are linked to this. Suddenly there are concrete frameworks for leadership models, the basis for feedback calls is in place and the framework can be linked to the company’s selection methods to capture the right profiles when recruiting. As a result of the anchoring work, a uniform and comprehensible language emerges in the business, togetherness is created around what qualities are assessed and developed. Not least, conditions are created for diversity in recruitment and promotion.

MARIA LAHNE, SENIOR ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT, ASSESSI

“Businesses that succeed in establishing competence frameworks that are truly rooted, concrete and underpinned by solid analysis are winning so much. They capture who has the potential to act in line with the criteria demanded in selection processes. They develop their leaders in pursuing their leadership in line with their skills. By making the framework the hub of their work, they also succeed in developing their performance management. “

MARIA LAHNE, SENIOR ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT, ASSESSI

Establishing a framework always starts with an analysis; Do different employee roles make different demands? Are there different criteria for success at different leadership levels? Are there differences in roles that require completely different behaviors to achieve the goals? Does the business have a genuine valuation basis that is expressed in behaviors? Based on an in-depth collaboration, lined up with role analysis, review of materials, strategy and future challenges, workshops… yes, even observation in the role establishes a unique and concrete framework. Strategic HR initiatives are linked to this. Suddenly there are concrete frameworks for leadership models, the basis for feedback calls is in place and the framework can be linked to the company’s selection methods to capture the right profiles when recruiting. As a result of the anchoring work, a uniform and comprehensible language emerges in the business, togetherness is created around what qualities are assessed and developed. Not least, conditions are created for diversity in recruitment and promotion.